It is the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, obtaining, patronizing, or soliciting of a person for the purpose of a commercial sex act, in which the commercial sex act is induced by force, fraud, or coercion.

SEX TRAFFICKING IS SLAVERY

THE NUMBERS

The International Labour Organization (ILO) estimates that more than 40 million people around the world were victims of modern slavery in 2016.

At any given time in 2016, 4.8 million people were victims of forced sexual exploitation. On average, they are held for 23.4 months in their situation before escaping or being freed. The vast majority are women and girls. Children represent more than 20% of the victims.

One out of every three adolescents on the street will be lured toward prostitution within 48 hours of leaving home, according to the National Incidence Studies of Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrownaway Children.

A report from the U.S. Justice Department and the Urban Institute found that pimps surveyed from eight major U.S. cities cited making anywhere between $5,000 to $32,833 per week.

HOW VICTIMS ARE TRAFFICKED

TRAFFICKERS USE DIFFERENT METHODS TO RECRUIT VICTIMS.

1.    False Job Advertisement
2.    Sold by Family
3.    "Boyfriend"
4.    Other
5.    Abduction
6.    Trafficked By Friend
7.    False Immigration

HOW TRAFFICKERS LURE THEIR VICTIMS

PROTECTION

HOME

LOVE

ADVENTURE

OPPORTUNITY

HOW TRAFFICKERS ENSURE COMPLIANCE

VIOLENCE

FEAR

THREAT

INTIMIDATION

SIGNS OF SLAVERY
  • They can be coerced into drug use by his or her traffickers, or turns to substance abuse to help cope with his or her enslavement.

  • They may be distrustful and suspicious. A victim of human trafficking may act as if they distrust any person who offers them assistance or attempts to converse with them.

  • They may demonstrate affection towards abuser. It is possible they have developed Stockholm Syndrome, where kidnapped victims, over time, become sympathetic to their captors.

  • They feel that they are unable to leave their current situation.

  • Has a trafficker who may act as a translator or insist on being present and/or translating; may be unable to speak for oneself or share one’s own information; information is provided by someone accompanying the individual; or may seem to adhere to scripted or rehearsed responses in social interaction.

  • They are accompanied by a controlling person, and does not speak on his or her own behalf, but instead defers to another person.

  • They are transported to or from work, or lives and works at the same place.

  • They are unable to keep his or her earnings: it is “withheld for safe-keeping.” In many cases, the person owes a debt they are working to pay off.

  • They are frightened to talk to outsiders and authorities, since they are closely monitored and controlled by their trafficker(s). They may be fearful, depressed, and overly submissive.

  • They may have signs of abuse, and a person may show signs of being denied food, water, sleep, and/or medical care.

  • Lives with multiple people in cramped space.

  • White Facebook Icon
  • White Twitter Icon
  • White Instagram Icon
  • LinkedIn - White Circle

Copyright © Safe House Project
info@safehouseproject.org

(202) 596-2073

Charitable Tax ID: 82-3487081